Tracks

At UVM, we understand that everyone’s story is unique, and that everyone’s journey toward their education and professional goals is different. That’s why we’ve built our Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program with a variety of specialized tracks. Whether you are on your way to pursue a career in dentistry, or have your sight set on getting into pharmacy school, UVM has a path for you.

With our specialized Post-Baccalaureate tracks, you’ll get the education you need to be successful in your field of interest. Choose from:

Doctor. MD. Physician. Medical Practitioner. Surgeon or specialist. Regardless of the title, with a thorough understanding of the science of medicine, doctors help restore and maintain the health of their patients. Their work involves the study, diagnosis, and treatment of injury or disease.

To achieve the necessary level of knowledge and expertise, doctors complete medical school, practice under supervision during a residency, and pass licensing exams—a lengthy endeavor.

In order to be admitted to medical school, prospective students without the required sciences below can take advantage of UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program to meet the premedical requirements.

Those seeking to enhance their prior science courses can enroll in courses through UVM Continuing and Distance Education and receive premedical advising without an application.

A Note from Your Advisor:

It is important to realize that the vast majority of applicants to the highly competitive medical schools in the US apply with more than the minimum course requirements.

Further, direct patient care experience is critical to the process, ensuring that the student knows what medicine is all about. Research experience, readily available at UVM, is strongly encouraged.

Twenty percent of medical schools require college calculus and English. The “Medical School Admissions Requirements” reference, available at major bookstores, is a good starting point to compare requirements for schools of interest. The AAMC website also has important information.

UVM Larner College of Medicine Linkage: 

We enjoy a close affiliation with the UVM Larner College of Medicine, located on our main campus. Students do research with medical school faculty, study at the Dana Medical Library, and can access the Guaranteed Interview Linkage via the Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

Sample Curriculum:

2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Organic Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters General Biology with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Physics with labs, 10 credits

Highly Recommended:

Biochemistry (lab not required), 3 credits
Microbiology with lab, 4 credits

Recommended:

Genetics
Cell Biology
Medical Ethics
Nutrition
Biomedical Statistics

Osteopathic Physician, DO

Fully licensed medical practitioners, Doctors of Osteopathy (DOs) focus on the health of the whole patient. Just like MDs (allopathic doctors). they are licensed to perform surgery and prescribe medication. With additional training in osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT), a DO adds the use of his or her hands for diagnosis. DOs complete osteopathic medical school, practice under supervision during a residency, and pass licensing exams just as MDs do. One in 10 practicing physicians in the US currently is a DO, and they are also certified through their national professional association. In order to be admitted to an osteopathic program, prospective students without the required undergraduate science courses can take advantage of the premedical path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Osteopathy mirrors allopathic doctors, and osteopaths (DOs) do residencies in the same hospitals, receive insurance reimbursements, compete for specialties, and practice much the same as MDs with the addition of a holistic philosophy and diagnosis with the aid of manipulation. The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine guarantees an interview for all UVM Post-Baccalaureate Premedical student applicants who have successfully completed Post-Baccalaureate studies and meet the requirements of this linkage agreement for regular application or the option to apply early, before completing the MCAT, and thereby skipping the glide year.

Sample Curriculum:

2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Organic Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Biology with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Physics with labs, 10 credits
1 semester Biochemistry (lab not required), 3 credits

Recommended Courses:

Anatomy & Physiology
Microbiology
Cell Biology
Genetics
Nutrition

Dentists evaluate, diagnose, prevent, and treat diseases and disorders that contribute to our oral and overall health. The future of dentistry is bright, with technology and research playing significant roles in dental practice. A dentist can be an independent entrepreneur, able to balance work and personal life with a private or a shared practice, or focus on research or surgery as specialties.

To become a dentist, completion of a graduate dental school program is required, plus clinical practice in an educational setting, before passing licensing exams.

In order to be admitted to dental school, prospective students without the required undergraduate sciences can take advantage of the Pre-Dental path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Dentistry is a career that offers greater independence from insurance limitations and lends itself to independent practice. Manual dexterity and a flare for art fit nicely. Shadowing one or more dentists is highly recommended. Given the relationship between medicine and dentistry, the curriculum is similar, and some institutions that offer both programs combine medical and dental students in the first year. Pre-Dental students at UVM are eligible for the Committee Letter Process, just as Premedical students are.

Sample Curriculum:

2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Organic Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Biology with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Physics with labs, 10 credits
2 semesters English, 6 credits
1 semester Sculpture, 3 credits

Highly Recommended:

Microbiology
Biochemistry
Cell Biology
Nutrition

Pharmacists are a part of the health team caring for patients with direct patient contact. The majority of pharmacists work directly with the public, but there is also opportunity for research, hospital patient care, and innovation with a pharmacy career. With the rapid growth of the pharmaceutical industry and an aging population, becoming a pharmacist is in demand.

In order to be admitted to pharmacy school, prospective students without the required undergraduate science courses can take advantage of the Pre-Pharmacy path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Pharmacy is a critical link in the patient care chain, which includes considerable direct patient contact and care. Investigate the possibilities here through this website.

UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program has a linkage agreement with the Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Vermont campus, which guarantees an interview to all students who complete the UVM Post-Baccalaureate Premedical program and meet the ACPHS linkage requirements.

Sample Curriculum:

For students entering the third of a six-year program:
2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters General Biology with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Organic Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
1 semester Statistics, 3 credits
1 semester Calculus I, 3 credits
1 semester Microbiology with lab, 4 credits
2 semesters Physics, 6 credits
1 semester General Psychology, 3 credits
3 semesters Humanities, 9 credits
1 semester Public Speaking, 3 credits

Highly recommended:

Liberal Arts electives

A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse with a master’s or doctoral degree. Some current master’s degree programs will soon transition to DNP (doctoral) programs.

According to the American Nurses Association, approximately 60% to 80% of primary and preventive care can be performed by nurse practitioners. In order to achieve this level of expertise, nurse practitioners complete master’s or doctoral graduate studies and pass licensing exams.

UVM offers a Direct Entry Program in Nursing (DEPN) designed for career changers without a nursing degree. Further, UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program offers both a Pre-Nurse Practitioner track as well as a linkage agreement with UVM’s DEPN program, which guarantees an interview to all those who meet the requirements.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Nurse Practitioner programs for students with a bachelor’s degree other than nursing vary widely in terms of requirements. The minimum course requirements may not equal those of the competitive applicant, so additional science background is recommended. NPs see patients and write prescriptions. Nursing has always been recognized in other countries, so practice abroad is certainly an option.

Sample Curriculum for Post-Baccalaureate Nurse Practitioner Program:

In order to be admitted to an NP Program, prospective students with a bachelor’s degree but without required undergraduate sciences can take advantage of the Pre-Nurse Practitioner track in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

2 semesters Human Anatomy & Physiology, 8 credits
2 semesters Chemistry with lab, 8 credits
1 semester Microbiology with lab, 4 credits
1 semester Human Nutrition, 3 credits
1 semester Statistics, 3 credits
1 semester Human Development (across the lifespan), 3 credits

Recommended:

Courses in Biology, Psychology, Sociology, and English

Curriculum Tracks for Nurse Practitioner Programs

Researching programs of interest and summarizing the courses required will be necessary before you can determine your specific needs. Our advisor is available to assist you regarding your plan. These plans include more courses than some programs require. Also, you may have recently completed some of the required courses as part of your undergraduate degree, thereby reducing the number of courses needed.

Option A: Summer Term Start
Summer Term

2 Anatomy and Physiology with labs: ANPS 19 & ANPS 20, 4 credits each (also available during the academic year)

Fall Term

1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 001, 4 credits
1 General Chemistry: Outline of General Chemistry, CHEM 23, or General Chemistry, CHEM 31, 4 credits
1 English, 3 credits
1 Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 152, 3 credits
Prep for and/or take GRE

Spring Term

1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 002, 4 credits
1 Outline of Organic & Biochemistry, CHEM 26, 4 credits, or Outline of Organic Chemistry, CHEM 42, 4 credits, or General Chemistry 2, CHEM 32, 4 credits. NOTE: Some more selective programs require two General Chemistry courses (CHEM 31 & 32) plus a biochemistry. Please discuss which level of chemistry with your advisor.
1 Statistics, STAT 111, 3 credits
1 Nutrition, NFS 43, 3 credits

Summer Term

1 Genetics, BCOR 101, 3 credits
1 Sociology, Social Organization of Death & Dying, SOC 154, 3 credits

Option B: Fall Term Start
Fall Term

1 Human Anatomy & Physiology, ANPS 19, 4 credits
1 General Chemistry: Outline of General Chemistry, CHEM 23, or General Chemistry, CHEM 31, 4 credits. Please discuss which level of chemistry with your advisor.
1 English, 3 credits

Spring Term

1 Human Anatomy & Physiology, ANPS 20, 4 credits
1 Outline of Organic & Biochemistry, CHEM 26, 4 credits, or Outline of Organic Chemistry, CHEM 42, 4 credits, or General Chemistry 2, CHEM 32, 4 credits NOTE: Some more selective programs require two General Chemistry courses (CHEM 31 & 32) plus a biochemistry. Please discuss which level of chemistry with your advisor.
1 Statistics, STAT 111, 3 credits
1 Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 152, 3 credits

Summer Term

2 Principles of Biology courses with labs, BIOL 001 & 002, 4 credits each

Fall Term

1 Biochemistry, Agricultural Biochemistry, PBIO 185, 3 credits
1 Microbiology, Microbiology & Infectious Disease, MMG 101, 4 credits
1 Nutrition, NFS 43, 3 credits
Between terms prepare and/or take GRE

Spring Term

1 Genetics, BCOR 101, 4 credits
1 Psychology, 3 credits
1 English, 3 credits

To improve function and movement, physical therapists prevent and treat a wide variety of physical conditions due to disease, injury, or repetitive stress. A physical therapist attempts to reduce pain, restore functionality and movement, and prevent future injury or disability.

With a high level of direct patient care, physical therapists have many options for healthcare settings. Individual states have different licensure requirements, but physical therapists can choose from, for example, private practice, hospitals, sports and fitness centers, universities, home healthcare, assisted living facilities, or outpatient clinics to perform their care.

In order to be admitted to a Physical Therapy Program, prospective students without required undergraduate science courses can take advantage of the Pre-PT path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

UVM also offers a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Program for those with a bachelor’s degree and offers the resources of UVM’s Larner Medical School and Level I Trauma Center Hospital.

A Note from Your Advisor:

There are many blended program options available to students; the following curriculum is a sample for a DPT program designed for those with a bachelor’s degree. Programs that combine a bachelor’s degree with a graduate program often require application to both at the outset of the undergraduate program. Many programs require the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). This profession is physically demanding and offers career flexibility.

Sample Curriculum:

2 semesters Anatomy & Physiology, 8 credits
2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Physics with labs, 10 credits
1 semester Biology, 4 credits
1 semester Exercise Physiology, 4 credits
1 semester Psychology, 3 credits
1 semester Statistics, 3 credits

When published requirements are not specific regarding the number of credits or a lab, be sure to check with their admissions office.

Under the supervision of a licensed physician, a PA practices medicine as a clinician with direct patient care responsibilities. Like the physicians they follow, physician assistants have a variety of options for career paths, such as working in a private practice, a hospital setting, or a community health center. The curriculum in a PA program is equally intense, but not as long as medical school, making it attractive for students who wish to complete their studies earlier and begin their direct patient care sooner.

In order to be admitted to a PA program, prospective students without the required undergraduate sciences can take advantage of the Pre-Physician Assistant path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

Students will need significant direct patient care experience prior to application, which many acquire and complete in the greater Burlington area concurrent with their studies. The required hours vary by program from 250 to 2,000.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Course requirements and timetables for Physician Assistant programs vary widely. Students should research programs of interest; here is one good source: www.aapa.org. Developing a spreadsheet to assess common denominators in requirements in order to decide course choices is recommended. You can then plan your optimal curriculum in conjunction with your advisor.

UVM’s program has linkage agreements with the University of New England and Franklin Pierce programs, which guarantee an interview for all UVM Post-Baccalaureate Premedical students who meet their requirements and have successfully completed Post-Bac studies.

Physician assistants are now able to specialize in many areas and are recognized in other countries. They will be among the “physician extenders” who are expected to fill the growing need for practitioners in the coming decades.

Sample Curriculum:

2 semesters General Biology with labs, 8 credits
2 semesters Advanced Biology with labs, 6 credits OR
2 semesters Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
1 semester Anatomy and Physiology, 4 credits (Note: Many programs require 6 or 8 credits with labs)
1 semester English (including composition), 6 credits
2 semesters Psychology or Sociology, 6 credits

Highly Recommended:

Statistics, Microbiology, Nutrition, Physics, and Organic Chemistry

Curriculum Tracks for Physician Assistant Program

Researching programs of interest and summarizing the courses required will be necessary before you can determine your specific needs. Our advisor is available to assist you regarding your plan. These plans include more courses than some programs require. Also, you may have recently completed some of the required courses as part of your undergraduate degree, thereby reducing the number of courses needed.

Option A: Summer Term Start
Summer Term

2 Anatomy and Physiology with labs: ANPS 19 and ANPS 20, 4 credits each (also available during the academic year)

Fall Term

1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 001, 4 credits
1 Chemistry, CHEM 31, 4 credits
1 English, 3 credits
1 Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 152, 3 credits
Prep for and/or take GRE

Spring Term

1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 002, 4 credits
1 General Chemistry 2, CHEM 32, 4 credits
1 Statistics, STAT 111, 3 credits
1 Nutrition, NFS 43, 3 credits

Summer Term

1 Genetics, BCOR 101, 3 credits
1 Sociology, Social Organization of Death & Dying, SOC 154, 3 credits

Option B: Fall Term Start
Fall Term

1 Human Anatomy & Physiology, ANPS 19, 4 credits
1 Chemistry, CHEM 31, 4 credits
1 English, 3 credits

Spring Term

1 Human Anatomy & Physiology, ANPS 20, 4 credits
1 General Chemistry 2, CHEM 32, 4 credits
1 Statistics, STAT 111, 3 credits
1 Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 152, 3 credits

Summer Term

2 Principles of Biology courses with labs, BIOL 001 and 002, 4 credits each

Fall Term

1 Biochemistry, Agricultural Biochemistry, PBIO 185, 3 credits
1 Microbiology, Microbiology & Infectious Disease, MMG 101, 4 credits
1 Nutrition, NFS 43, 3 credits
Between terms prepare and/or take GRE

Spring Term

1 Genetics, BCOR 101, 4 credits
1 Psychology, 3 credits
1 English, 3 credits

With a thorough understanding of animal anatomy, physiology, disease, and treatment, veterinarians help restore and maintain the health of the animal population. Like physicians, veterinarians study, diagnose, and treat injury and disease, as well as provide preventive care for their patients. Good communication skills are essential, since vets must work closely with the owners of their patients for the best outcome.

Vets can specialize in a broad range of fields and animal types, including internal medicine, research, public health, domestic animals, wildlife, and livestock. To become a veterinarian, one must complete graduate medical education, a residency, and pass licensing exams.

In order to be admitted to vet school, prospective students without undergraduate science degrees can take advantage of the Pre-Veterinarian path in UVM’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program.

A Note from Your Advisor:

Veterinary schools usually require more foundation courses than do medical schools. They also vary significantly, so interested students should research veterinary schools of interest to determine a list of courses needed. Animal care experience with a variety of animals is important. There is a shortage of large animal veterinarians across the US. Note below the “hard to find” courses that UVM offers.

Commonly Required Courses:

2 semesters English (including composition), 6 credits
2 semesters Physics with labs, 10 credits
2 semesters General Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semester Organic Chemistry with labs, 8 credits
2 semester Biology with labs, 8 credits
1 semester Genetics, 3 credits
2 semesters Mathematics, 8 credits
1 semester Biochemistry, 3 credits
2 semesters Social & Behavioral Sciences, 6 credits
2 semesters Humanities & Fine Arts, 6 credits

Animal Science Major/Courses
Pre-vet students have the “hard to find” course options available through UVM’s Animal Science Department. Prior students have told us that these courses gave them a nice advantage as veterinary school applicants. Here are some commonly chosen courses:

Courses:
ASCI 043 – Fundamentals of Nutrition
ASCI 117 – Horse Health and Disease
ASCI 118 – Applied Animal Health
ASCI 141 – Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
ASCI 168 – Animal Genetics and Breeding
ASCI 171 – Zoos, Exotics, and Endangered Species

Featured Summer Course for Pre-Vet Students

CREAM:  Integrated Large-Animal and Agricultural Operation Management: On-Farm Dairy Intensive
Offered each summer is a program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) at the University of Vermont. During the summer 8 to 15 students manage a herd of 60 registered Holstein and Jersey cattle. This on-farm experience also includes special projects and field trips and offers students an uncommon experiential learning experience that will help distinguish them as future agriculture leaders. For more information>>

Planning Your Curriculum–One-on-One

Given differing veterinary school requirements and the fact that many of our students come with some of the required courses already completed, we invite you to schedule a personal or telephone appointment with our Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Pre-Health Advisor in order to line out a possible curriculum plan. You can schedule an appointment by calling 800-639-3210.

Post-Baccalaureate Veterinarian Program at UVM

NOTE:  Many Post-Baccalaureate Pre-Vet students have completed some of the required courses in the recent past. Your advisor will discuss adapting the curriculum plan below accordingly.

Two-Year Plan Starting with Summer Term

Summer
2 General Chemistry courses intensively over eight weeks
CHEM 31 and CHEM 32, 4 credits each
(Assumes current with precalculus – algebra with trigonometry)

Fall Term
1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 001, 4 credits
1 Organic Chemistry, CHEM 141, 4 credits
1 Calculus I (MATH 19, 3 credits, or MATH 21, 4 credits)
Between terms, prepare for GRE here or the second winter

Spring Term
1 Principles of Biology, BIOL 002, 4 credits
1 Organic Chemistry, CHEM 142, 4 credits
1 Calculus II (MATH 20, 3 credits, or MATH 22, 4 credits)

Summer Term
2 Physics with labs over 10 weeks (algebra-based)
PHYS 11 with lab PHYS 21, 5 credits
PHYS 12 with lab PHYS 22, 5 credits

Fall Term
1 Animal Physiology with lab, ASCI 141, 4 credits
1 Biochemistry (CHEM 205, 3 credits, or grad-level BIOC 301, 3 credits)
Elective Animal Sciences or English, Humanities, Social Sciences, as needed

Spring Term
1 Genetics: Animal Genetics & Breeding, ASCI 168, or Genetics, BCOR 101, 3 credits
1 Nutrition: Fundamentals of Nutrition, NFS 43, 3 credits
Any remaining Animal Science, English, Humanities, or Social Science courses

Two-Year Plan Starting With Fall Term
The biggest change to a fall start would be that the two General Chemistry courses would be taken Fall and Spring terms instead of the two Organic Chemistry courses, which would move to the following summer as a pair. The two Physics courses would then move to the second year, Fall and Spring terms, perhaps leaving less room for other required courses or pushing them to the second summer.

Need help deciding what’s right for you? Our advisors are here to help.