Springfield Lecture Series

Spring 2015 (January – May)

 

Former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin

Former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin speaks warmly with Kathleen Fellows, right, after her recent program on “Making the Business Case for Family Friendly Work Policies”which followed the theme of her latest book, “The New Feminist Agenda.”

Programs are held at 2 pm Tuesday afternoons at the Nolin Murray Center, Next to St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 38 Pleasant Street, Springfield, Vermont

THE NEW SCIENCE OF HAPPINESS
January 27
Dr. Steve Taubman: Author, Motivational Speaker and Magician

Enjoy a little magic in this program when our speaker combines his entertaining magic with elements of positive psychology, Eastern mindfulness practice, and neuroscience to provide a new perspective on how to live a full, rewarding life in which we can take charge of our mental state and make a positive contribution to others. Learn specific, proven steps to increase happiness, become aware of methods for interrupting stress and negative emotions, and learn how to embrace our changing roles as senior citizens.

TOWN MEETING: RELIC OR MODEL FOR THE FUTURE?
February 10
Frank Bryan: Author, Professor Emeritus Political Science, UVM

A town meeting is a legislature of citizens, for citizens, and by citizens. Bryan, a nationally recognized expert on this topic, will describe this unique type of Vermont government. Hear Bryan’s response to those who say that town meetings do not meet the needs of modern governance with his argument that the future and town meetings are made for each other, and Vermont is in the unique position to lead America by this example of “Real Democracy.” With Town Meeting Day coming up soon, this is a very appropriate topic to understand our local heritage of governing.

ORGANIC FARMING IN THE CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY
February 24
Jon Cohen: Owner of Deep Meadow Farm, Ascutney, VT

Hear the story of how someone changed careers and settled into the joys and trials of organic farming in the local Connecticut River Valley. Learn the benefits of organic farming and issues that he needs to deal with, along with his experiences of dealing with making it an economic success.

200 YEARS OF BARNS
March 10
Curtis B. Johnson: Photographer and Architectural Historian

Understand how settlers in northern New England adapted Old World antecedents and succeeding generations evolved new designs to create the many distinctive barns found throughout our region. Learn to identify and date the common barn types as Johnson, co-author of the book Buildings of Vermont, shares his photographs of Vermont barns.

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: AN OVERVIEW
March 24
Robert B. Santulli, M.D.: Honorary Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Alzheimer’s disease is becoming a major public health crisis. There are now more than 10,000 people with the disease in Vermont, and over 5 million in the US. As the population ages, there may be as many as 16 million persons with Alzheimer’s disease in the United States by the middle of this century, if no cure or prevention is developed by that time. This presentation will explain the differences between Alzheimer’s and dementia, describe the most common risk factors for the disease, and review the common signs and symptoms. It will outline how physicians make the diagnosis, and discuss treatments currently available. Finally, it will review what is known about health and lifestyle factors that may lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

ECOLOGY & GEOLOGY OF VERMONT: THE SHAPING OF OUR LANDSCAPE CO-SPONSORED BY THE SPRINGFIELD GARDEN CLUB
April 7
Eric Hanson: Conservation Biologist, Vermont Center for Ecostudies

Vermont is at the crossroads of several ecological regions, from areas with oaks and black locust trees in the south to boreal forests in the northeast. We will learn how various factors, including soil and climate, have influenced not only what we see on the landscape, but how these factors have shaped the human settlement of the region over the past 300 years.

THE NEOLITHIC WORLD OF STONE: FROM STONEHENGE TO GOBEKLI TEPE
April 21
Bob Manning: Artist, Art Historian and Professor Emeritus of Fine Arts

Who built Stonehenge and why? When and how was it constructed? From his own photographs taken on site, Manning will address these questions as well as other related matters about major Neolithic sites constructed thousands of years ago at Stonehenge, Newgrange, Avebury, Orkney and Cornwall. He will include photos from his latest travels to the Gobekli Tepe stone circles in Turkey that pre-date Stonehenge by 6,000 years.

WHAT THE FOUNDERS OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION HAD IN MIND
May 5
Kevin Ryan: Director of Communication & Education, Vermont Bar Association

What did the American Founders think they were doing when they debated and drafted the U.S. Constitution? What were they “framing”? What was learn.uvm.edu/osher their vision of the nature of the polity they were creating? How did it differ from what had gone before? How do particular features of the Constitution carry out the new Vision? What were the anticipated risks highlighted by the so-called Antifederalists? What does the debate over the Constitution say to us today, more than 200 years later? Join constitutional scholar Kevin Ryan for an exploration of what the Constitution established and how that can affect the way we look at the American system today.

GREAT “UNFINISHED” MUSIC MASTERPIECES
May 12
Bill Cotte: Professor Fine & Performing Arts, Lyndon State College

Several great composers have left us ‘unfinished masterpieces’, sometimes by default and sometimes inadvertently…and sometimes deliberately! We will explore, in sight and sound, ‘unfinished’ works by Schubert, Bruckner and Mahler…masterpieces that have stood the test-of-time even in their incomplete state…and yet seem fully ‘complete’! Professor Cotte will give pertinent critique and information to enhance our listening skills as we watch video and enjoy well-known symphonies present these musical pieces. Come adventure in music with us!


Membership Information

SEMESTER MEMBERSHIPS:

$45 for all 9 programs and admittance to the other Vermont Osher Institute Programs; Single program fee: $8

Send Memberships to:
OLLI–Springfield
JOYCE LINDAMOOD, TREASURER
P.O. BOX 92
SPRINGFIELD, VT 05156
Make checks payable to: The University of Vermont

Become a member today!

Membership in the Springfield Osher Lifelong Learning Institute entitles members to attend programs in other Osher Institutes established in seven other locations throughout Vermont, as well as EEE-Burlington (Elder Education Enrichment). Your active OLLI membership also entitles you to the discounted member rate for the new OLLI on UVM campus programs. Simply present your membership card during the corresponding semester.

For a complete listing of all programs, see our listing in a pdf format.

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