About ENGS 057 F

Introductory courses addressing the representation and construction of "race" in literature and/or the contributions of ethnically diverse writers to the American culture. Focus and readings vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit with different content.

Notes

Open to Degree and CDE students; Cross-listed with CRES 096 J; total combined enrollment = 50

Section Description

In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." More than a century after this statement was made, race and racism remain one of today’s most pressing social, legal, and ethical concerns. This class will explore how some of today’s most influential authors envision the racial terrain across various racial and ethnic borders. Through these contemporary American race narratives, we will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the boundaries of DuBois’s color line across multiple racial communities, and explore how writing and reading can both reflect and challenge racial categories, hierarchies, and perceptions. Some of the themes we will investigate include whiteness and multiculturalism, immigration, inclusion/exclusion, gender and sexuality, inter-generational conflicts, authenticity, borders (geographical as well as other types of boundaries), and BlackLivesMatter in an age of neoliberalism and white nationalism.

Evaluation

2 race narratives, interview project, active in-class participation.

Course Dates

to

Location

Perkins Building 102 (View Campus Map)

Times

to on Tuesday and Thursday

Important Dates

Note: These dates may change before registration begins.

Note: These dates may not be accurate for select courses during the Summer Session.

Deadlines
Last Day to Add
Last Day to Drop
Last Day to Withdraw with 50% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw with 25% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw

Resources

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