About CIS 001 OL1

U.S. statues, regulations, and judicial decisions dealing with cybersecurity; politics and policies that are relevant to cyberspace governance; ways to create digitally resilient organizations; the relationship between cybersecurity and sustainability.

Notes

Open to Degree and CDE students

Section Description

No Cybersecurity--No Sustainability. The laws, policies and regulations governing behavior in cyberspace must be understood by cyberspace stakeholders so they are aware of the requirements and constraints these authorities place on cyber defense, the evolving impacts of national and international policies in creating a more secure cybersecurity environment, and how to effectively interact with organizational leadership to properly orient their organizations to deal with cybersecurity issues. Importantly, to be most successful going forward, good cybersecurity is not just a goal to protect someone’s data. Without cybersecurity, we cannot rely on the power of electronic data creation, storage, analysis and exchange to drive our push to fight the impacts of climate change and environmental degradation, or to level the playing field for people in developing countries as they seek educational, social and economic opportunities.

Section Expectation

This 14 week course is composed of four modules. Three modules are 4 weeks long: Law, Policy, and Changing Organizations. Approximately every other week, these modules will feature a Sustainability Packet, which is a learning module comprised of short readings and videos that will address specific aspects of the relationships between cybersecurity and sustainability. The fourth module is 2 weeks long in, and at the end of the second week it features a table-top cyber exercise as a lab experience. Module I, Law (4 weeks). In the first module you will examine the most important U.S. statutes and regulations dealing with cybersecurity, and explore how these authorities are implemented through a review of judicial decisions on different cases based on these laws. These authorities will include laws that criminalize unauthorized hacking into computer systems, as well as those that penalize those who are hacked for their loss of sensitive information. There is a packet on the human side of cybercrime, Hackers and Hacking – a topic we will revisit in the third module. ► Sustainability Packets for this module are: 1. Rare Earth Metals, Energy Use and the Information Economy; and 2. The Internet, Sustainability, and Human Rights. Module II, Policy (4 weeks). In the second module you will explore the politics and policies that are relevant to cyberspace governance and identify the important national and international efforts and perspectives that are shaping the evolving regulation of cyberspace. Importantly, from a perspective of sustainability, you will also compare and contrast the two primary current models for government regulation of cyberspace, that is, the global commons perspective shared by the governments of Western and democratic developed nations, such as the U.S., and the cyber sovereignty one shared by the governments of authoritarian nations, such as the People’s Republic of China. ► The Sustainability Packets for this module are: 3. Enabling Big Data, the Exploitation of At-Risk Human Beings, and Combatting Environmental Degradation; and 4. China, the Internet, and Sustainability. Module III, Cyber Exercise (2 weeks). In the third module you will develop an understanding of the complexities of the use of force in cyberspace, and in the 2.5 hour long cyber exercise you will role-play a particular government, industry, civil society, business, or academic character in an emergent cyber breach situation that threatens to cause serious damage to infrastructure and the environment. The goal is to learn about the equities of these different stakeholders and how they interact with each other in confronting a crisis situation. Module IV, Changing Organizations (4 weeks). This module is scenario-driven. In the Changing Organizations module, you will consider the steps that are necessary to bridge the gap between a technical scheme of cyber defense, and the common operational vision that an organization must achieve to determine which information assets it needs to protect, with what measures, at what cost and residual risk. For many organizations today, this represents nothing short of a sea change in the way they approach cybersecurity, and your end-of-course project will be a presentation that you and your teammates develop to propose a concept plan to a company’s senior management on how to best approach its cybersecurity needs. This concept plan will address different competing drivers of organizational action, including legal and regulatory requirements as well as internal initiatives such as sustainability. ► The Sustainability Packet for this module is: 5. Deploying Cyber to Fight Climate Change.

Evaluation

Graded Assignment Type Quiz: 26 short quizzes, 155 questions total (each question worth the same point value) 36 points total Discussion Forum Postings: 5, each worth 4 points, 20 points total End of Module Exam: 2, each worth 15 points, 30 points total Team Project -- End of Course: 1, worth 14 points

Course Dates

to

Location

Online (View Campus Map)

Important Dates

Note: These dates may change before registration begins.

Note: These dates may not be accurate for select courses during the Summer Session.

Deadlines
Last Day to Add
Last Day to Drop
Last Day to Withdraw with 50% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw with 25% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw

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