About BHSC 281 A

Introduces students to the nucleic acid and protein-based molecular diagnostics technology through class presentation, reading, and discussions. Focuses on diagnostic applications for understanding molecular mechanisms of disease. Prerequisite: CHEM 042 or CHEM 141.

Notes

Prereqs enforced by the system: CHEM 042 or CHEM 141; MLS students must take lecture and lab (BHSC 282 A); Non MLS students may take lecture without lab; Open to Degree and CDE students

Section Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the nucleic acid and protein -based molecular diagnostics technology through class presentation, reading, and discussions. The course will focus on the molecular mechanisms of human diseases and how applied molecular technology assists in diagnosis and treatment of these conditions. The course has a companion laboratory course (BHSC 282), which will provide students an opportunity to perform some of the techniques covered in the lecture.

Section Expectation

This is an upper level course and and students are expected to be fully engaged during class sessions. Coming to class prepared, having completed the assigned readings and formulating questions, will allow for a more enriched classroom experience for all. At the completion of this course students should be able to: 1. Understand the fundamental elements of molecular biology and genetics and apply this understanding to diagnostic applications. 2. Describe the theories and methodologies of common clinical laboratory diagnostic applications. 3. Describe the diagnostic method for both nucleic acid and protein-based analysis as appropriate for different clinical applications. 4. Describe the principles and procedures for nucleic acid isolation, quantitation, and quality control. 5. Describe the principles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection of RNA and DNA. 6. Understand the uses for both classical and modern methods for DNA sequencing. 7. Compare and contrast the advantages and limitations of different molecular diagnostic techniques. 8. Discuss the molecular mechanisms of human diseases, in the context of clinical significance and describe the importance of laboratory procedures in diagnosis and treatment of disease.

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated through a variety of assessments which may include lecture exams (one per each unit), weekly quizzes, take-home-assignments, class participation, and a final project including a written and oral component.

Course Dates

to

Location

L/L Commons 314 (View Campus Map)

Times

to on Tuesday and Thursday

Important Dates

Note: These dates may not be accurate for select courses during the Summer Session.

Courses may be cancelled due to low enrollment. Show your interest by enrolling.

Deadlines
Last Day to Add
Last Day to Drop
Last Day to Withdraw with 50% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw with 25% Refund
Last Day to Withdraw

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