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Environmental Studies: Intro EcoPsyc

ENVS 195 CS1 (CRN: 15615)

3 Credit Hours

About ENVS 195 CS1

This spring break course introduces students to the full sweep of what is currently meant by the term ecopsychology, covering the field’s psychological, philosophical, practical, and critical/political dimensions. By expanding the focus of psychology to include the relationship between humans and nature, ecopsychology aims not only to develop a truer picture of human psychology, but also to draw attention to the psychological dimensions of the ecological crisis. Students are expected to dedicate as much time as possible to the course in order to benefit from its intensive nature; to engage in personal explorations, sharing some of their experience with the rest of the class; and to participate in an all-day field trip to a nearby wilderness location, with appropriate winter gear. As this is an introductory course, no prior formal knowledge of psychology is necessary.

Notes

Spring Break course; 9:00 - 2:00 Saturday, March 5 - Sunday, March 13; Location: Living/Learning A 161 NOTE: The course includes a full-day outing, date TBD; Minimum Sophomore standing; Open to both CDE and Degree students; Prereqs enforced by the system: ENVS 001, 002 or NR 001, 002, or ENSC 001

Section URL

Section Description

This spring-recess course introduces students to the full sweep of what is currently meant by the term ecopsychology, covering the field’s psychological, philosophical, practical, and critical/political dimensions. By expanding the focus of psychology to include the relationship between humans and nature, ecopsychology aims not only to develop a truer picture of human psychology but also to draw attention to the psychological dimensions of the ecological crisis. Learning outcomes include: 1. A good introductory knowledge of the range of thought and activity associated with ecopsychology, including a familiarity with the main figures to have developed the field to date. 2. An ability to situate ecopsychology relative to conventional psychological approaches, including specific philosophical, methodological, and political differences. 3. A familiarity with the experiential practices of ecopsychology, gained in part via first-hand experience. 4. Improved interpersonal and oral skills, and an improved ability to draw on subjective or personal material in a scholarly way. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Section Expectation

This is an intensive course taught over the spring recess. Students are expected to dedicate as much time as possible to the course in order to benefit from its intensive nature. It is highly recommended that students complete the readings for the course in the Jan-Feb period ahead of the classroom dates, as discussed in the syllabus. The course has a seminar format. It includes lectures by the course director, classroom discussion, video presentations, and experiential exercises. Students are expected to engage in personal explorations and to share some of their experience with the rest of the class. They are also expected to participate in an all-day field trip to a nearby wilderness location, and to have appropriate winter gear for this outing. The required reading materials for the course are two texts and a packet of readings.

Evaluation

Grades will be based on: 1. Attendance and Class participation. 2. Reflection Journal. 3. Ecological Autobiography. 4. Final Project (due 3 weeks after the final class).

Meetings

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Location

On Campus (View Campus Map)